info@synthetex.com 1-800-253-0561

Water

Water resources are used in various ways including direct consumption, agricultural irrigation, fisheries, hydropower, industrial production, recreation, navigation, environmental protection, the disposal and treatment of sewage, and industrial effluents. Water is the earth's most valuable resource with rainfall nourishing its oceans, rivers and streams with the lifeblood that sustains and supplies the needs of all living things.

Synthetex uses dependable products and methods to maximize value for private and public infrastructure projects. Whether you need to maintain or improve existing infrastructure, plan new construction to expand capacity or want to minimize life-cycle costs, Synthetex provides sustainable solutions. We even specifically designed our HYDROTEX® product for underwater structures, and it can help with the following:

  • Rivers, Canals and Inland Waterways
  • Locks and Dams
  • Coastal and Marine
  • Water and Irrigation
  • Stormwater

Market Sectors

Rivers, Canals and Inland Waterways

Human pressure, unsustainable use and floods and droughts driven by changes in climate all have negative effects on rivers. read more

Locks and Dams

Sometimes in order to navigate a river, a lock is required to go around an obstruction—such as a rapid, dam or mill weir—to avoid complications with the change in the level of the river across it. read more

Coastal and Marine

Sea conditions can be rough and change unexpectedly. Mean sea level and extreme water levels can rise, storms can hit hard and frequently, and dominant wave directions can turn. read more

Water and Irrigation

Irrigation provides communities with many benefits, including making agriculture a possibility at all in areas that were previously considered unsuitable for major crop production. read more

Stormwater

Stormwater runoff comes from precipitation from rain or snowmelt. With the addition of roads, driveways, parking lots, rooftops and other surfaces that prevent water from soaking into the ground, the volume of runoff greatly rises. read more

Scroll to Top